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There was progressive memory loss for 2 years in a female patient. She was thinking about quitting her job based on report writing and data analysis. He was confused and was confusing the names of his pets.2 The patient at work kept forgetting the faces he had been familiar with before, forgetting the password of his closet in the gym.Therefore, his assistants had to constantly remind the patient of his daily work schedule. Patient No. 3 was so bad that she had to use an iPad to record everything and then she forgot her password. She was aware of the fact that the patient was starting to be unable to continue her thoughts amidst her sentences. There is now perhaps a cure for Alzheimer's patients like this.
Patient brain on the left, Normal Brain on the right
There was progressive memory loss for 2 years in a female patient. She was thinking about quitting her job based on report writing and data analysis. He was confused and was confusing the names of his pets.2 The patient at work kept forgetting the faces he had been familiar with before, forgetting the password of his closet in the gym.Therefore, his assistants had to constantly remind the patient of his daily work schedule. Patient No. 3 was so bad that she had to use an iPad to record everything and then she forgot her password. She was aware of the fact that the patient was starting to be unable to continue her thoughts amidst her sentences. There is now perhaps a cure for Alzheimer's patients like this.
Since the time it was first defined, there has been no effective treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) for more than 100 years. A small study of a new comprehensive and personalized program designed to reverse memory loss for the first time. 9 of the participants showed objective and subjective improvements in their memory within 3 to 6 months after the start of the program. All 6 patients who could not continue to work continued to work with advanced performances or were able to return to their work. Developments should be continued and the longest patient follow-up from this article was one and a half-two years after the start of treatment. Amnestic (memory) mild cognitive disorder (ADPD) or subjective cognitive disorder (SBP; when a patient indicated cognitive problems). Patients with a diagnosis of late stage Alzheimer's disease.

Together with the Buck Institute for UCLA Mary S. Easton, established for Alzheimer's Disease Research, the Buck Institute is currently working on aging to recover memory loss in patients with extensive dietary changes, brain stimulation, exercise, sleep optimization, specific medicinal products and vitamins With a 36-point, complex therapeutic program, and with several additional steps affecting the chemical structure of the brain, improvements can be maintained. Stit Aging (Aging), published very encouraging findings in the online journal. In addition, the results are based on personal narratives. Therefore, a larger-scale controlled clinical study is required. Ular said Dale Bredesen, Professor at the Buck Institute, UCLA ' Director at the Easton Center, The August Rose Neurology and the author of the study. ”In the case of AH, there is no drug that prevents the development of the disease or slows the progression of the disease, drugs only have a modest effect on the symptoms, ın said Dale Bredesen. Dale Bredesen.
Cardiovascular diseases, cancer and other chronic diseases such as HIV have been developed as a result of the use of combined therapies. A wide range of combined therapies for Alzheimer's and other memory disorders have not yet been found. A few decades ago, genetic and biochemical investigations revealed the intense linkage of molecular interactions in the pathogenesis of AH. These findings suggest that a larger-based therapeutic approach may be more feasible and potentially more efficient for Alzheimer's-induced cognitive decline treatment in a single drug site that targets a single goal. tek said Bredesen. Extensive preclinical studies from various laboratories have identified single pathogenetic targets for potential intervention in human studies (single-targeted therapeutic approaches have not been confirmed). A multiple target can be detected within the underlying network, and each target can be successful even when it is relatively moderately affected. the effects of targets may be additive or synergistic. The monotonous failure in drug trials on Alzheimer's has affected Brenda's research, which can help us understand the essential nature of the disease. Bredesen's laboratory has found evidence that Alzheimer's disease is caused by an imbalance in nerve cell signals, with specific signals in the normal brain promoting nerve connections and memory repair, while balancing signals support memory loss, while unrelated information also allows to be forgotten. The balance has been damaged, nerve connections are suppressed and memories are lost. The multiple targets model and an imbalance in signal communication indicate that contrary to popular belief, Alzheimer's is a toxic disease caused by the accumulation of adhesive plaques in the brain. It is believed that amyloid beta peptides, the source of Bredesen plaques, have a normal function in the brain, such as increasing the signals that cause deviations in nerve conduction.
In the light of all this information, Bredesen thinks that a systematic approach rather than a single target agent is a better solution. Süre The presence of Alzheimer's drugs affects a single target, but the AH is much more complicated. Imagine a roof with 36 holes in it, and your medicine can only close a hole well. A single hole will be repaired when the drug works, but you have 35 holes left in it, and so on. Bredesen's approach has been personalized on a patient basis and is based on extended tests aimed at determining what affects the brain's flexible signaling network. but does not include all components. Components include; (1) removed all simple carbohydrates from his life, which resulted in a weight loss of 9 kg; (2) he removed gluten and processed foods from his diet, consumed plenty of vegetables, fruit and fish, and (3) reduced stress, and began yoga: (4) a second measure to reduce stress at the workplace, we started twice a day for 20 minutes, (5) received melatonin every night; (6) to increase sleep every night from 4-5 hours to 7-8 hours; (8) took vitamin D3 every day; (9) fish oil every day; (10) CoenzymeQ10; (11) opted for oral hygiene using electric toothbrush; (12) started to reuse hormone replacement therapy; 13) at least 12 hours between breakfast and dinner, there was at least 3 hours between dinner and sleeping time, (14) every week 4-6 days a day for at least 30 min exercise. The disadvantage of this program is the complexity of the program. It is not easy to follow the responsibility of patients and caregivers, and none of the patients are fully adhered to the protocol. Most of the dietary complaints, lifestyle changes and multiple pills needed every day were the two most complained. Bredesen said. This therapeutic system, in contrast to the side effects of many drugs, improves health as major adverse effects and helps to create an optimal body mass index. Ard In light of the results for 9 out of 10 patients in the study, memory loss can be reversible and improvement can be maintained with the therapeutic program. Edes Bredesen added, This is the first successful show. I At the same time he warned, the results should be repeated. results based on a larger trial, where only the results are confirmed or refuted the results, but the degree of routinely achievable developments, how an approach can be effective in familial Alzheimer's patients, should be able to identify important questions such as how long the progress can be sustained. Cognitive decline is the most important concern of the aging population. Today, Alzheimer's disease affects about 5.4 million people in the United States and about 30 million people worldwide. Our prospects for the future without effective measures and treatments are not profoundly pleasing. It is estimated that 160 million people worldwide will be infected with Alzheimer's, including 13 million Americans. Unlike some chronic diseases, Alzheimer's is increasing, according to recent assessments, AH has become the third leading cause of death in the US after cardiovascular disease and cancer.

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