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The brain-machine interface processes the senses of motion using the recording of hundreds of neuron signals from both lobes of the monkey brain. For example, the animal steers the wheelchair by simultaneously turning the brain activity to reach a bowl of grapes.
Neuroscientists from the Faculty of Health at Duke University have developed a brain-machine interface (BMI-machine interface) for guiding primates to the robotic wheelchair. The brain-machine interface processes the senses of motion using the recording of hundreds of neuron signals from both lobes of the monkey brain. For example, the animal steers the wheelchair by simultaneously turning the brain activity to reach a bowl of grapes.

This interface described in Scientific Reports on March 3 shows the potential for muscle control and mobility in patients with ALS and tetraplegia. Göz It's not even possible to blink some patients with disabilities. EEG devices or wheelchairs may not be sufficient. In our study, better control of wheelchairs can be achieved by using intra-brain implants, içi said Miguel Nicolelis, Duke University's medical doctor. Scientists who began experiments in 2012, hundreds of hair thin microfibers, the two rhesus macaque premotor and somatosensori regions of the brain. He then trained the animals passively to reach their goal (a bowl of grapes). During this training phase, they recorded large-scale brain frequencies of primates. Then he programmed the computers to translate his brain signals.
When the monkeys learned that they could move the wheelchair by thinking, they moved the grapes more easily and quickly. When the Duke team examined the cycle and rotation motions corresponding to the brain signals, the apes discovered that they were thinking and calculating the distance to access the grapes in the bowl. Unlar Normally, a signal that was not at the beginning of this study, the apes began to make the task more capable. It really was a surprise, because we've seen how much flexibility this brain has shown to adapt to the device,, says Nicolelis. The activity of 300 neurons was measured in two monkeys. The Nicolelis laboratory stated that this was done up to 2000 neurons with the same technique. The team is now looking for ways to use the implant in humans by recording more neuronal signals, increasing accuracy and compliance.

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